May 6, 2022

241 West 28th Street

241 West 28th Street is a through-block, thoughtfully designed, multifamily project being developed by MAG Partners in the highly coveted Chelsea neighborhood. Construction commenced in November 2020 and the building will include 480 apartments with 30 percent built as affordable under the Affordable NY program. Designed by celebrated architects COOKFOX Architects, the exterior of the building is contextual masonry inspired by the rich historic architectural fabric of the neighborhood, while the residences will incorporate biophilic design strategies that connect its residents to nature. The development will include approximately 8,500 square feet of ground floor retail.

May 6, 2022

335 Eighth Avenue

MAG Partners was selected by Penn South, the affordable housing cooperative in Chelsea, to develop 335 Eighth Avenue into a mixed income apartment building with ground floor commercial space, including a grocery store.  The new 190-unit building will be developed under the Affordable NY Program with thirty percent of its units reserved for low- and middle-income New Yorkers.

The redevelopment will replace the aging existing building with a modern, contextual seven-story building that is about 200,000 square feet, designed by renowned local architects COOKFOX.  At the heart of Penn South, the design seeks to bridge the historical character of Chelsea, 21st century visions of urban living and contemporary aspirations for a new building that supports sustainable and healthy living.

May 6, 2022

300 East 50th Street

300 East 50th Street is a 194-unit multi-family building with ground floor retail at the corner of East 50th Street and 2nd Avenue. In partnership with Safanad, KRW Realty Advisors and Krown Point Capital, MAG Partners assembled the site for a mixed-income building with thirty percent of the units built as affordable under the Affordable NY program.  Designed by BKSK Architects, the building’s strong corner presence and verticality is created by detailed masonry that melds the traditions of the solid masonry corner towers of Manhattan’s Midtown East and Upper East Side neighborhoods.